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Veterans benefits might play a role in late-life care planning

With the recent passing of Veteran's Day, many people honored veterans young and old through posts on social media, time spent with loved ones and attendance at local events. The day reminds us that veterans provided service to this country in a number of ways, and the country returns that service in part through benefits programs for veterans. When planning for care in late life, vets and their families should keep those benefits in mind.

According to the California Department of Veterans Affairs, the state is home to as many as 1.8 million vets. Benefits are most important when vets first leave the military and as they age, says the agency. Vets are offered benefits in the areas of education, employment, housing, health care, advocacy and VA Claims.

Health care and access to assisted living and other housing situations are some of the benefits that become important to vets as they age. The programs offered by the VA and CalVet attempt to provide quality of care on a continuous basis for veterans, and that includes long-term care. Families of vets who are in need of in-home or nursing home care should understand what benefits and rights a vet has so they can take full advantage of these benefits when planning for care.

A vet might also have access to financial benefits, which is important in planning long-term care and for the passing of an estate. Understanding and making use of all your benefits can help you enjoy life longer and create a legacy that can be passed on to your heirs and loved ones. Working with a professional who understands how your benefits can work with your assets and life goals helps you make the most of your rights.

Source: California Department of Veterans Affairs, "Veteran Services/Benefits," accessed Nov. 13, 2015

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